Smart Investments in Kitchen Cabinetry — a Realtor’s Advice

Smart Investments in Kitchen Cabinetry — a Realtor’s Advice

Read the article at the above link for excellent advice on specifics related to kitchen remodeling!

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The Best Kind of Kitchen

What would be your ideal kitchen?  Something fancy and grand?  Something quaint and cozy?  Something simple and sleek?

Even more important than the appeal of the design is the feeling you get when living in your kitchen.  It is the heart of the home, the most used room in the house, the warm place everyone tends to gather, no matter how small.  If you think of it like that… a gathering room… then what becomes of the dream kitchen you imagine?

Take a look at House Beautiful’s slideshow of designer kitchens.  Here are a few of my favorites…

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Call me old fashioned. I am! But, I just love this mix of farmhouse and formal elements.

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The size and beauty of this kitchen is cleverly extended with large, untrimmed archways.  Simple and breathtaking elegance!

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Small and casual kitchens are not to be thought fruitless of potential!  What a fun idea to paint the cabinet interiors with a bright and cheery color!  Such a delight should give one joy to be in the kitchen!

There are endless, fabulous solutions for every size kitchen and every size budget.  What do you want to improve in your kitchen?  Ask me!  I’ll be more than happy to help with a free consultation!

iPad Giveaway!

Well, of course like everything else, it requires a bit of effort on your part.

Houzz.com holds a monthly drawing for a free iPad to those who review their favorite home designer or building pro (hint-hint!).

So, whether you really, really like me or just want a chance to win a new iPad, give me a super duper review on Houzz.com!

Click the link on the left that says “See my Houzz profile” or click here for more details.

Client Relationships

In the business of home remodeling, relationships with clients are different than in any other industry.   The upmost sensitivity and care is required when working in and on someone else’s home.  The process puts the clients in a very vulnerable state and they are at the very mercy of the builder and his team.   Unfortunately, the average builder has no recognition and compassion for this fact.

A few days ago I decided to put my philosophies in writing and place them where I can see them every morning upon arrival at the office.   These philosophies are ones I’ve held internally as long as I can remember, but had never before actually put them into words.  Seeing these beliefs written seems to make them absolute and insoluble.

1.   Infuse passion in our work.  (We LOVE what we do! Let it show! Excitement is contagious.)

2.  Ensure our clients know we care every day in communications and actions. (Let them know they are important to you and your business!)

3.  Take time to plan, be efficient and productive. (Rushing costs more in the end.)

4.  Make team bonding a priority. (Because we are only as good as or weakest link.)

5.  Communicate, communicate, communicate with everyone on the team.  (It is how things get done and mistakes are few.)

A happy client = a successful project = positive referrals and repeat business = a healthy business and a happy owner!

 

It’s Not Just About Looks

Wait a minute, did I just say that? Of course it about looks! But, it’s also about feeling. Have you ever noticed that spaces evoke feelings? Usually it’s the smallest, indiscreet details that create the mood of a space.

For example, have you ever noticed what a difference window and door trim makes in a room? How about crown moulding? Trim details such as these can make or break a renovation.

How about shadows and lines, textures and shapes, balance of color and placement of decor? When assembled well, all of these factors blend together to create a harmonic space in which people love to be.

When I was in design school one of the required courses was freehand drawing. We had to draw such things as pinecones and kitchen utensils and feet. What the heck did that have to do with architecture? I thought the professor was a little tapped, to be honest. But, towards the end of the course, I realized that I was noticing more and more design details, important details that really affected the sense of a space.

Then came the “wax on wax off” aha moment. The smallest elements really count! Pay attention to them! They deserve to be noticed.

P.S. I also learned that I can draw a mean ice cream scoop. 😉

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